About

 

Volunteers with sale items in "treasures."

The “treasures” section of the Superfluity sale is chaired by Jane, Karen and Brenda.

Superfluity is a long-standing tradition of University Congregational United Church of Christ. Started more than 50 years ago by the Women’s Fellowship of the church, it has grown to involve more than 100 volunteers.

In 2014, the sale raised $34,000, which was distributed through grants to 22 nonprofit organizations, most of which serve low-income people.

The sale takes please each year, usually the first or second weekend after Easter. It runs from Thursday evening until early Saturday afternoon.

Items featured in the sale include plants, books, jewelry, games, linens, kitchenware,

Books are a very popular item at the sale.

Books are a very popular item at the sale.

antiques, art, children’s clothing, sports items, toys, tools, home decor items, small appliances, CDs, DVDs, records and other collectibles.

Lunch is served on Friday, and an assortment of home-baked goods are available.

A Brief History

The very first Superfluity sale took place on March 16, 1962. Sponsored by the Women’s Fellowship, it was called a White Elephant sale, and raised $1,366.18. Proceeds supported scholarships for church youth and other church expenses.

Volunteers Evelyn and Janis contribute their horticultural expertise to providing both plants and advice about gardening.

Volunteers Evelyn and Janis contribute their horticultural expertise to providing both plants and advice about gardening.

In 1964 the sale was named Superfluity, and the tradition has continued on an annual basis. The sale committee began charging admission in 1973 to increase the proceeds. Then in 1984 the group began giving away the proceeds to nonprofits that support vulnerable children, youth and women.

The Women’s Fellowship faded away over the years, but the sale continued on stronger than others, powered by a group of men and women who enjoyed the opportunity to serve a good cause. The Superfluity committee is now made up of groups of volunteers, each of which focuses on a particular sale area – books, plants, bakery, treasures, housewares, decor, sports, children’s toys and clothes, jewelry, electronics, tools and hand-crafted “boutique” items.

Now in its 53rd year, the sale has raised more than half a million dollars. Among the statistics harder to measure are the countless volunteer hours preparing for and staffing the sale, the number of people who have donated valuable items, the amount of “stuff” that has been kept out of landfills through re-use and the countless opportunities for fellowship among church members.